Ancillary Health Insurance

Ancillary benefits are a secondary type of health insurance coverage. When traditional health insurance doesn't cover deductibles, copays, or out-of-pocket expenses, ancillary benefits can reduce the insured's financial burdens.

 

Health plans aren't enough to keep employees healthy because they still need oral and vision care.

 

There are many types of ancillary benefits. Here are some examples (but not an exhaustive list) of health and welfare ancillary benefits:

  • Critical illness insurance. Usually, a critical illness plan pays the insured a lump sum payment if the insured is diagnosed with certain covered illnesses, such as cancer, heart attack, kidney failure, or stroke.
  • Hospital indemnity insurance. A hospital indemnity plan pays a fixed amount of money for a hospital stay on a per-day, per-week, per-month, or per-visit basis.
  • Life insurance. A common benefit, life insurance pays a fixed amount of money upon the insured's death. Many life insurance policies also offer accidental death and dismemberment benefits, which pay fixed amounts in situations where the insured person dies or is dismembered due to an accident.
  • Disability income insurance. Disability income insurance is a wage replacement benefit that replaces the insured person's wages if they cannot work due to a disability.
  • Long-term care insurance. Long term care coverage provides the insured person with a fixed daily amount for services associated with a lengthy illness or disability, such as nursing homes, assisted living centers, hospice, and home healthcare.

Woody's insurance is an independent insurance agency that allows us to help with all of your insurance needs. And find the best and most affordable health and life protection.

Ancillary Insurance Carriers

Woody’s Insurance has access to a large group of Ancillary Insurance Carriers. A few are Humana, United Health Care, Aneta, Cigna, Mutual of Omaha. Contact us for a full list and types of products.

List of Ancillary Benefits

There are many types of ancillary benefits. Here are some examples (but not an exhaustive list) of health and welfare ancillary benefits:

  • Critical illness insurance. Usually, a critical illness plan pays the insured a lump sum payment if the insured is diagnosed with certain covered illnesses, such as cancer, heart attack, kidney failure, or stroke.
  • Hospital indemnity insurance. A hospital indemnity plan pays a fixed amount of money for a hospital stay on a per-day, per-week, per-month, or per-visit basis.
  • Life insurance. A common benefit, life insurance pays a fixed amount of money upon the insured’s death. Many life insurance policies also offer accidental death and dismemberment benefits, which pay fixed amounts in situations where the insured person dies or is dismembered due to an accident.
  • Disability income insurance. Disability income insurance is a wage replacement benefit that replaces the insured person’s wages if they cannot work due to a disability.
  • Long-term care insurance. Long term care coverage provides the insured person with a fixed daily amount for services associated with a lengthy illness or disability, such as nursing homes, assisted living centers, hospice, and home healthcare.
  • Dental/vision insurance. Dental and vision plans are limited benefit plans that provide benefits solely for specified dental and vision expenses.

Woody’s Insurance can help you with any of these products and the major carriers. 

Ancillary Service Insurance

In a medical setting, the physician performs the primary obligation of assessing and treating a patient. However, physicians also rely on a support system that includes laboratories, therapists, nurses, and other healthcare providers. This support system constitutes ancillary care.


Since laboratory tests, nursing care, and rehabilitative hospital stays are important, they are included in most health insurance and the primary care given by physicians as benefits.

Additional Rider Insurance

Does “one size fits all” apply to life insurance?


Often, the answer is “no.” That’s where “riders” come in.


Riders are essentially additional benefits added to an insurance policy that often require an additional premium payment. In this way, riders can customize a life insurance policy to address specific needs or concerns.


Riders offer supplemental coverage to your life insurance policy and accommodate any unexpected events that aren’t covered within coverage alone. Like the term conversion rider, some standard life insurance riders are included in your policy for free. But others, such as the waiver of premium rider, cost extra and can be hard to qualify for.


Whether or not you should add a rider depends on the type of life insurance rider you’re getting, what coverage you are looking for, and how much more you can afford to pay on your policy’s premiums. Often, a standalone insurance policy will offer more coverage than a rider will, but some riders might be worth the additional cost, depending on your needs. 


There is an additional cost if a party decides to purchase a rider. Most are low because they involve minimal underwriting.

Ancillary Products

The definition of ancillary is “providing the necessary support to the primary activities or operation of an organization, institution, industry, or system.” Ancillary benefits with health insurance are no different. They are secondary products available to help enhance insurance plans—the term ancillary groups several types of secondary products together.


Some examples of ancillary care products are:


Cancer

Accidental

Life

Vision

Dental

Hearing

Home health

Short-term medical

Hospital Indemnity plans


These products are here for you to use, along with insurance, to help make the most out of your plan. Woody’s Insurance has all of your Ancillary needs.